This is what inspires me to write marine mystery crime novels


Although photographs can never quite capture the beauty or magic of the Solent and Portsmouth harbour, this was indeed a magical moment when, returning to Portsmouth from the Isle of Wight on the Wightlink ferry, we were held up outside the harbour for ten minutes because the cross channel ferries were coming out of the narrow and  stunning entrance. We didn't mind at all because it was an opportunity to enjoy the spectacular sight.

The sun was shining and we went up on deck to take these photographs.  In the photograph above, the fast cat Brittany ferry is following the Brittany car ferry out into the Solent while to the right the Hovercraft is making its dash across the Solent and in the foreground is a tourist pleasure boat called Wight Scene.  You can also see two of the Forts, Lord Palmerston's follies.

I've seen this sight a thousand times but it never ceases to enthrall me. Portsmouth Harbour and the Solent is such a vibrant area and the sea ever changing, which is what makes it so exciting and why I chose to set my crime novels in the area.

The above shot was taken from the rear of the Wightlink ferry.  We're coming into Portsmouth Harbour with Old Portsmouth on the left, and behind us is Wight Scene.


This is Inspector Andy Horton's patch, Portsmouth harbour.  You can see the masts in the background of HMS Victory and HMS Warrior and in the foreground to the right is Old Portsmouth. Dominating the harbour is the Spinnaker Tower, which hasn't yet been mentioned in an Andy Horton novel.  Maybe it should.

And finally here we are coming into dock at Portsmouth Town Camber, which is mentioned in many of my Inspector Horton marine mysteries including, Deadly Waters and The Suffocating Sea.

I hope you enjoy the photographs.

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