Q & A with crime author Pauline Rowson - what is your greatest struggle as a writer

From the moment I discovered a wonderful place full of free books - my lovely local library in Portsmouth when I was about eight - I was hooked both on reading and writing. From that moment my ambition was to either be an author or a journalist.  I made it to being an author but it took a very long time and I am pleased to say a highly successful career in marketing and PR before I got there, working for multinational companies before running my own Marketing and PR Agency which I sold in 2003 to concentrate on a writing career.

From the age of eight I was fired up with a strong desire to become a fiction writer.  I wrote my first adventure novel when I was 11 (I was an  Enid Blyton fan) and I also used to write plays which, as kids, we'd perform in my parent's garage at our semi-detached house in Portsmouth.

Then during my career in marketing and PR I wrote several business books but still had that hankering to write novels, which I began seriously to do in 1988.  It took me until 2006 before I was first published and many trials and tribulations, errors and experimentation along the way until I found my 'voice'. Since then I have had published fifteen crime novels, twelve in the DI Andy Horton series, two standalone thrillers . Novel number sixteen is being published in May 2016 by Severn House, Dangerous Cargo, the second in the Art Marvik marine thriller series.

So getting published has to be the answer to that question.

Visit my website for more information.

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