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Thursday, 26 February 2015

Rowson's Popular Solent Marine Mystery series featuring the enigmatic sailing DI Andy Horton optioned for TV

I'm thrilled to announce that the  DI Andy Horton marine mystery crime series has been optioned by one of the UK’s leading television production companies, Lime Pictures, who are seeking to bring the enigmatic sailing detective to life on screen. The series of currently eleven novels is set in the Solent area on the South Coast of England.


In January I met up with  Rebecca Hodgson, Head of Drama for Lime Pictures and Jo Combes, Drama Development Executive, at the World famous BAFTA club in London for lunch to discuss Andy Horton and the marine mystery crime series. It was great to meet them and exciting to hear how much they loved Horton and the crime novels.


Pauline Rowson outside BAFTA club for lunch with TV people -DI Andy Horton Marine Series

 Rebecca Hodgson, Head of Drama for Lime Pictures, says, ‘DI Andy Horton is a returning detective who can cut through the competition. His character is fascinatingly knotty, with his difficult childhood, troubled marriage and chequered career, and a detective who lives on a small boat and rides a motorbike is a fresh reboot of the TV detectives that we already know. We are confident that the intriguing partnership of Horton and Cantelli will attract a fantastic cast."

Pauline Rowson in the BAFTA Club London for meeting with the TV people re: DI Andy Horton Marine Crime Series

With a production base in Liverpool, Lime Pictures is the biggest independent production company outside of London and produces multiplatform content for global audiences. Lime is the home of the UK’s most talked about television – from cutting-edge formats to multi award winning, long-running drama. With a stable of quality writers and exciting directing talent, Lime has gained a reputation as a first class production house. The company works with big talent to deliver distinctive, ground-breaking projects.


This is an exciting development for the DI Horton crime series but there is a long way to go yet.  The broadcasters have also got to fall in love with Andy Horton and the Solent area. Here's hoping that they will and that one day soon many more people will enjoy the exploits of my flawed and rugged sailing, motorbike riding detective the hunky lost soul of Andy Horton.

Published by Severn House, the DI Andy Horton crime novels have been hailed in the UK and the USA as "exemplary police procedurals”, "cleverly plotted”, “complex and multi-layered.”

Rebecca Hodgson, for Lime Pictures, adds, ‘The unique angle of each DI Horton mystery being connected to the sea can truly set this series apart, making it look and feel distinctive from existing urban police procedurals or rural detective shows. The sailing element can make the series into a visual treat and the setting of historic Portsmouth, Hayling Island, and the Isle of Wight brings a landscape to screen that is rarely seen in drama and also reaches an underserved audience.’



Tuesday, 24 February 2015

What to know how to write a crime novel? Pauline Rowson will be at Gosport Discovery Centre 5 March 2015

I will be appearing at Gosport Discovery Centre on 5 March 2015 talking about the inspiration behind my crime novels and how I research, plot and write them. So if you love reading crime novels, or are interested in writing one then this talk will provide some great insights into the writing process.

I'll also be talking about the DI Andy Horton crime novels, recently optioned for television by top UK television production company Lime Pictures.  The DI Andy Horton novels are set against the stunning backdrop of the Solent, Portsmouth, the surrounding towns and the Isle of Wight.

Death Surge, the tenth in the series featuring the flawed and rugged sailing detective, DI Andy Horton is published in paperback on 5 March.

Death Surge, no 10 in the Solent based DI Andy Horton crime series


Death Surge is already published in hardcover and as an ebook by Severn House. It has been hailed in the USA as a "crisply written, cleverly plotted procedural with a nice twist." Booklist says, "Rowson also continues the intriguing saga of Andy’s search for the mother who disappeared in mysterious circumstances when he was a child."


A telephone call from a frantic Sergeant Cantelli to say that his nephew, Johnnie Oslow, is missing cuts short Detective Inspector Horton’s sailing trip to France. Summoned back to the Isle of Wight, Horton learns that Johnnie has not shown up for racing during Cowes Week, as previously arranged. The investigation is ranked low priority until the charred remains of a body are discovered in one of the disused tunnels at the Hilsea Lines in Portsmouth. What began as the hunt for a missing man becomes the search for a ruthless killer.

Crime author, Pauline Rowson at the Gosport Discovery Centre, Hampshire on 5 March 2015,  7.30pm. Tickets cost £4.00 and are available from the Gosport Discovery Centre.  Click here to book and for more details.

Hope to see some of you there!

Wednesday, 18 February 2015

Photos from my talk to Second Year Criminology and Forensic Studies Students at the University of Portsmouth

It was great to meet so many of the second year Criminology and Forensic Studies students at the Institute of Criminal Justice Studies, University of Portsmouth on Tuesday 17 February where I talked about crime writing and how I research, plot and write my crime novels. I hope that it provided an interesting insight for the students.



I took the students through how I map out my crime novels using mind maps and plot lines.  I've been told by a former detective of the Hong Kong police that my workings out are exactly how they used to map out the crimes they investigated, so there you have it.


Pauline Rowson talking to students about her crime novels and crime writing at the ICJS University of Portsmouth Feb. 2015




Pauline Rowson talking to students about crime writing at the ICJS University of Portsmouth Feb. 2015



The Institute of Criminal Justice Studies (ICJS) at University of Portsmouth draws together expertise across the range of criminal justice fields and has become an internationally renowned focal point for the multidisciplinary study of crime and criminal justice processes. They provide courses for undergraduate and postgraduate students from diverse backgrounds, using full-time, part-time and distance learning programmes, within an environment that is strong in both research and professional links.

Tuesday, 17 February 2015

Crime fact and fiction merge at Pauline Rowson's talk to criminology students at the University of Portsmouth

On February 17 I will be talking to second year Criminology and Forensic Studies students at the Institute of Criminal Justice Studies, University of Portsmouth. I will be talking about the fictional elements of crime, writing that is and how I research, plot and write my crime novels. I'm hoping that it will provide an interesting insight for the students and stimulate discussion on fact versus fiction. How much is crime fiction drawn from real life?  How realistically is it portrayed in crime novels? How much research do I conduct? These are the sort of questions that I am sure will be asked.

I will take students through how I map out my crime novels using mind maps and plot lines.  I've been told by a former detective of the Hong Kong police that my workings out are exactly how they used to map out the crimes they investigated, so there you have it.

Experts from the Institute of Criminal Justice Studies (ICJS) at University of Portsmouth have attended CSI Portsmouth, an annual event that I organise with Portsmouth City Council Library Service where I bring crime fact and fiction together with crime authors, crime experts and police in two lively panel debates. Members of staff from the ICJS have also helped me considerably with research.

I'm looking forward to meeting the students and lecturers and giving my talk.

The Institute of Criminal Justice Studies (ICJS) at University of Portsmouth draws together expertise across the range of criminal justice fields and has become an internationally renowned focal point for the multidisciplinary study of crime and criminal justice processes. They provide courses for undergraduate and postgraduate students from diverse backgrounds, using full-time, part-time and distance learning programmes, within an environment that is strong in both research and professional links. Read more on their website.

Friday, 13 February 2015

A lively WI and a pleasure to talk to them about the process of writing a crime novel

I enjoyed meeting members of the Stoke and North Hayling WI on Monday 9 February and entertaining them with tales of my criminality - fiction that is.

Pauline Rowson entertaining the ladies at Stoke WI with how she writes her crime novels


I explained how I research plot and write my crime novels and took a lively Q & A which was followed by a book signing.  It was great to give a talk to an audience so close to where I live for a change.  And lovely to begin the meeting singing Jerusalem and ending it singing the National Anthem.

Pauline Rowson explaining how she writes her crime novels- Stoke WI

This year sees Stoke and North Hayling WI celebrating their 70th anniversary while the Women's Institute organisation celebrate their centenary. What an achievement!

A brief glimpse of the history of the WI movement

It all began on 16 September 2015 in Anglesey when a group of farmers wives got together to help educate rural men and women and to encourage countrywomen to get involved in growing and preserving food to help to increase the supply of food to the war-torn nation. Education and the sharing of skills have always been at the heart of the organisation, and this remains true today. Now the WI is the largest women's voluntary organisation in the UK with over 212,000 members in 6,600 WIs.

The WI campaigns
The WI campaigns on many issues - their ethos is about changing things for the better and tackling the issues that matter to members. And one that matters to me along with many readers in the UK the WI's research findings on community libraries   "Volunteers cannot continue being used as sticking plaster in the library service says WI"

Their research and campaigns cover so many things, "From equal pay to climate change, from gaps in the midwifery workforce to the plight of the honey bee, WI members have embraced a diverse set of challenges and built a reputation for the WI as a practical and ambitious organisation that doesn't shy away from tricky issues." Read more on their  history and campaigns on their website
.


Pauline Rowson showing her plot lines and character sketches to Stoke WI - Feb 2015

Delighted to see that the WI is still thriving and long may it  continue to do so.


For all my speaking engagements visit the events page on my website.  To book me as a speak please contact me via my website. 




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