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Thursday, 26 May 2016

Walking is not only good for the soul but good for writers says crime author Pauline Rowson

Being a writer isn't all about pounding away at a keyboard or scribbling on paper, much of an author's time is spent thinking and what better way to do that than to go on a long walk and at the same time benefit from the exercise.  I also often combine my walks with research not only along the coastal paths and harbours where I live and where my DI Andy Horton crime novels are set but also in other areas where the Art Marvik marine mysteries are set, such as Dorset and East Sussex and, as the Marvik novels grow, this will take in other coastal locations in the UK.

I find walking particularly excellent for thinking through the plots of my crime novels and for trying to work out those tricky bits that I sometimes just can't seem to get my head around. Often my characters DI Andy Horton and Art Marvik get into places and situations that I think - great, and then I haven't a clue how to extricate them! While walking I'll mull this over along with other aspects of the novel I'm working on and will return to the computer refreshed and ready to tackle that tricky bit.

There are many more reasons why walking is good for crime authors, or any author come to that, it's free,  the fresh air is good for the complexion and it keeps you fit and healthy only don't get so engrossed in thinking that you fall off a cliff! You also  get to meet and see  many interesting people who can provide inspiration for characters, and more ideas for stories.

Walking also provides me with inspiration for new crime novels. Locations also spark ideas and I'm always looking for a good place to put a body!



Wednesday, 25 May 2016

From book to TV screen - Pauline Rowson talking to That's Solent about her crime novels

Tuesday, 24 May 2016

Shroud of Evil now in paperback & as an ebook - DI Andy Horton has a new mystery to solve, a body on a beach in a shroud

Thursday, 19 May 2016

Pauline Rowson talks about crime novels, characters, point of view and writing style, taken at CSI Portsmouth 2012

Tuesday, 17 May 2016

An extract from Silent Running, featuring Art Marvik, now published in paperback

Silent Running, the first in the series to feature former Royal Marine Commando, Special Boat Services Officer, Art Marvik, is now available in paperback.  It is also published in hardcover, as an ebook and in Large Print, and in July 2016 will be available as an unabridged audio book.

In Silent Running, Marvik finds himself being seconded to work undercover for the National Intelligence Marine Squad (NIMS) headed by Detective Chief Superintendent Crowder. It is Marvik's first mission for NIMS and he is sucked into a dangerous and deadly mission, in a race to find a killer whose slaying spree spans the decades.

The second in the Art Marvik marine crime series, Dangerous Cargo, will be published by Severn House in hardcover in the UK on 31 May 2016 and in the USA on 1 September 2016.


An Art Marvik marine crime novel


Marvik caught the sound of sirens in the distance. There was no time to lose. He leapt off the boat and sprinted to his own, knowing that somewhere in the car park or on the bank to his right the killer was watching him. He pressed the ignition at the helm. Nothing. He tried again. Shit! The sirens were growing louder. He didn’t have time to stay and be questioned by the police. Even if he did and explained the purpose of his visit and the fact he was investigating Esther Shannon’s murder and hoping to get some idea where Charlotte was being held and by whom, he could see his story being dismissed as ludicrous. The man who had murdered Esther Shannon was in prison. And Charlotte’s disappearance was much more likely to be laid at his door. After all he had been with her on Wednesday night. He had slept with her. Perhaps he hadn’t dropped her off at Town Quay but had dumped her body in the Solent. And he had been at that derelict coastguard cottage on Wednesday night when Ashley Palmer had gone missing. The police would claim that Charlotte and Ashley had been lovers and he had been jealous and had murdered them both. He was a trained killer. And what would they say of his motive for Ross’s death? His mind whirled as again and again he tried to start the engine. Someone would come up with a plausible motive, and his DNA and fingerprints were on Ross’s boat. And that had been the only evidence that had secured a conviction against Terence Blackerman.

The engine spluttered and died. The sirens were so loud now the police must be on the approach road to the marina. Should he abandon the boat and make for the shore, and return when the police had left? But no, they’d block the road and interview everyone who was around.

He tried again as the flashing blue lights came into view. At last! The engine sprang into life. He breathed a sigh of relief, cast off the only line at the rear holding him to the pontoon and, jumping on board, pushed up the throttle and swung out of the marina and into the river. He risked a glance back. There were no police on the pontoons but he could see activity at the marina.

Keeping strictly to the speed limit, not wanting to draw attention to himself, he motored slowly down the river towards the sea. Only once did he look back and see uniformed officers on the pontoon. It wasn’t until he was out to sea that he considered fully what had happened. Someone had given the police an anonymous tip-off. The killer most probably, and had the killer mentioned he’d seen a tall, muscular man with a scarred face climb on board the boat? You bet.

Littlehampton Marina, featured in the Silent Running


Littlehampton featured in Silent Running



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Thursday, 12 May 2016

How to write a crime novel - Pauline Rowson's Writing Tips

It’s often said that you should write about what you know, but I don't agree. I’ve never committed a murder, or been a police officer, and neither am I married to one. I’ve had no previous experience or knowledge of the law, except what I’ve read in crime novels, and I’ve never been to an autopsy, yet after many trials and tribulations I finally got the job as a crime writer.  It’s my belief that you should write what you are enthusiastic about, but you also need some additional qualities.

Persistence is essential in order to be able to ferret out the information you require. This can be desk research via the Internet, the library and/or by speaking to individuals. It also helps to have this quality in abundance to cope with the many knock backs and rejections every budding writer receives.

Patience is also required in order to be able to track down, read and analyse the reams of information you gather, a tenth of which might be useful and only a tenth of that which might finally appear in your novel. So you’ll also need to be selective.

You must have a keen interest in humanity, the ability to ask probing questions and listen to the answers. You should also have absolutely no desire to speak about yourself and your novel.

Keen observation skills and a good ear can both be utilised when travelling by public transport, an absolute must for an author. Observe body language, and develop a good ear for conversation. Listen to mobile phone conversations, they can provide a wealth of information on family matters and marital rifts!

All writers, published or otherwise, must be readers. It is by reading others’ novels that you see how they create tension, how they move their characters around the scenes, how they write dialogue and how they create atmosphere in their descriptions.

And all authors need an open enquiring mind. Once you open your mind to ideas they can come thick and fast and they can come from anywhere – that overheard conversation, that snippet of research you’ve just unearthed, a place you have visited or something you’ve seen or read.So there you have it, no previous knowledge or experience required just the desire to create, write, observe and enjoy.


Wednesday, 11 May 2016

Odiham in Hampshire get a taste for crime with Pauline Rowson

Members of Odiham U3A got the taste for murder on a bright sunny May day when I entertained them with tales of my crime busting heroes adventures, the rugged and flawed DI Andy Horton and my new hero, Art Marvik, the trouble former Royal Marine Commando, Special Boat Services Officer, now working undercover for the UK's National Intelligence Marine Sqaud,(NIMS).






Pauline Rowson entertains the audience at Odiham, Hampshire with tales of her crime fighting heroes

I spoke about how I write my crime novels set against the backdrop of the sea on the South Coast of England.

The enigmatic sailing detective  DI Andy Horton. features in twelve crime novels with Fatal Catch the latest in the Portsmouth based series and a new one due out early 2017.   Art Marvik introduced in Silent Running  will be undertaking his second mission for NIMS in Dangerous Cargo to be published on 31 May 2016

I talked about how I draw my inspiration from locations, primarily in the Solent area but also along the south coast of England; how I work up ideas for the novels, develop characters and plot lines.

The DI Andy Horton  crime novels have been option by top UK production company Lime Pictures, producers of Channel 4's Hollyoaks, who are seeking to bring the enigmatic sailing detective to the TV screens. So fingers crossed for that.

My talk  was followed by a lively Question and Answer session and a book signing. The audience were great. I  thoroughly enjoyed talking to them.





Pauline Rowson talking to readers and book signing at Odiham U3A, Hants.


You can view all my speaking engagements on the events page on my website

Tuesday, 10 May 2016

Read an extract from Silent Running featuring Art Marvik, now published in paperback


Silent Running, the first in the series to feature former Royal Marine Commando, Special Boat Services Officer, Art Marvik, is now available in paperback.  It is also published in hardcover, as an ebook and in Large Print, and in July 2016 will be available as an unabridged audio book.

In Silent Running, Marvik finds himself being seconded to work undercover for the National Intelligence Marine Squad (NIMS) headed by Detective Chief Superintendent Crowder. It is Marvik's first mission for NIMS and he is sucked into a dangerous and deadly mission, in a race to find a killer whose slaying spree spans the decades.

The second in the Art Marvik marine crime series, Dangerous Cargo, will be published by Severn House in hardcover in the UK on 31 May 2016 and in the USA on 1 September 2016.

The first in the Art Marvik marine crime series



Read an extract - Newtown Harbour, Isle of Wight


By the time he reached Newtown Harbour the wind had risen but the rain had come to little more than a few threatening and erratic flurries. He secured the boat and made for the cottage feeling troubled. A blackbird flew squawking into the air. On the surface everything looked the same. The cottage door was shut, the windows too; it was exactly as he had left it that morning. But there was something.

He scrutinized the garden and surrounding area. There was a branch of a shrub broken but nothing else. The rear door was locked and the alarm still set. He disengaged it and stood motionless for a moment, listening. Only the sound of the wind and the birdsong came to him. He studied the kitchen. Nothing had been disturbed or defiled. The kettle was exactly where he had left it on the dark blue range, the kitchen cupboards closed and his lap top computer was on the table in the centre of the room. He stiffened. No, that was wrong. It wasn’t exactly how he had left it. It had been moved just perceptibly. Or was that just him getting compulsive, obsessive and paranoid?

He crossed to it and studied it the computer and the table around it. The lid was down. It was the same distance from the edge of the table, the chair was in the exact position and yet as he studied both he knew there it was a fractionally different. Was it just his imagination? His eyes swung to the door which led into the hall and his pulse quickened. It was ajar as he had left it but he remembered looking back as he had set the alarm before leaving and like a snapshot the image reframed itself in his mind. Having a photographic memory was a gift and he’d developed that to become a skill over the years in combat. The door was open slightly wider than when he had left and Charlotte couldn’t have done that because she had been beside him when he had set the alarm.

Swiftly he went through the rest of the house looking for more signs of the intruder. He found them in his bedroom and in the living room. They were minuscule and would not have been noticed by anyone else but he knew exactly where and how everything had been left. There was a drawer not quite closed, a book slightly at an angle, a tube of toothpaste moved ever so slightly in the bathroom. Whoever had been here had been no common burglar because nothing had been stolen or wrecked. He had no television, no valuables, no money lying around, only his lap top and that was practically an antique. Whoever had entered the house had been expert, but not expert enough. His blood was pumping fast, the adrenalin was coursing through his body – not caused by fear or anger, he swiftly acknowledged, but with by exhilaration.

He recalled the flash of light he’d seen earlier through his binoculars and knew that Charlotte had been correct. Someone had followed her here and someone had been watching the cottage.

Newtown Harbour one of the locations for Silent Running, featuring Art Marvik


 

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