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Thursday, 30 June 2016

Walking in art Marvik's footsteps in Dangerous Cargo

Last week I took the opportunity to walk in Art Marvik's footsteps on a return visit to Kimmeridge Bay in Dorset which is featured in the latest Marvik marine crime novel, Dangerous Cargo, published by Severn House in the UK on 31 May 21016 and in the USA on 1 September.

In Dangerous Cargo, Marvik's mission for the UK's National Intelligence Marine Squad (NIMS) is to catch a ruthless killer whose murders span over half a century. He tracks down a man he believes is involved to Clavells Cafe and Restaurant in Kimmeridge Bay.

Kimmeridge Bay featured in Dangerous Cargo

It was a return visit to the area for me because I visited it for research purposes for Dangerous Cargo, the second in the Art Marvik series.







Following in Marvik's footsteps in Dangerous Cargo, looking across to Poole


The Jurassic Dorset coast is a spectacular backdrop for Dangerous Cargo and you can see where Marvik's mission takes him along the coast and to the Dorset coastal town of Swanage in previous blogs and in the video trailer.

There's the chance to win a signed copy of the new Art Marvik marine crime novel, Dangerous Cargo, and the latest DI Andy Horton crime novel, Fatal Catch.. Simply enter the Portsmouth International Port's free prize draw.





The competition closes 30 June 2016.






Wednesday, 29 June 2016

Spectacular Dorset Coast setting for the latest Art Marvik marine crime novel, Dangerous Cargo

Art Marvik, has a new and deadly mission to accomplish for the UK's National Intelligence Marine Squad (NIMS) to catch a ruthless killer whose murders span over half a century. His mission takes him along the spectacular Dorset coastline as well as to the coastal towns of Swanage and Poole and to the Hampshire waterfront town of Southampton and the Solent.

Here are some pictures of  where Dangerous Cargo is set as former Royal Marine Commando, turned marine investigator, Art Marvik tracks down a killer.


A great setting for the second Art Marvik marine crime novel Dangerous Cargo, Dorset

Art Marvik, has a new and deadly mission to accomplish for the National Intelligence Marine Squad (NIMS) to catch a ruthless killer whose murders span over half a century.  Tough, fearless and fit, Marvik is not bound by the rules of the law.

Rocky setting on Dorset coast for Art Marvik in Dangerous Cargo

For his second mission with the National Intelligence Marine Squad, (NIMS) Marvik is detailed to attend the funeral of a man who’d officially been declared dead fifty-five years earlier. So who is the imposter and why did he assume the name of a dead man? What’s more, why did he suddenly show up in a Dorset coastal town in 1989, hook up with a local fishing family, and after fathering a child, disappear in 1990?

Swanage lifeboat going out around Anvil Point


When an innocent woman is killed during the course of the investigation, Marvik realizes that the stakes are much higher than he’d previously thought. As he begins to uncover a trail of deceit, corruption and murder that spans over half a century, Marvik must confront a ruthless killer who will stop at nothing to make sure that the sins of the past stay in the past.

Dorset Coast, setting for Art Marvik marine crime novel, Dangerous Cargo


Dangerous Cargo, an Art Marvik marine crime novel by Pauline Rowson

Dangerous Cargo is published in hardcover in the UK and is available from all good bookshops and on line.  It can also be loaned from all UK libraries.

It will be published in the USA on 1 September 2016 when it will also be released as an ebook on Kindle and Kobo and will be available on loan from USA libraries.

Buy Amazon UK.

Buy Amazon USA 



Tuesday, 28 June 2016

Crime author Pauline Rowson on what makes crime fiction so popular


Crime fiction is one of the best selling genres and the most borrowed from public libraries. So what is it that makes crime fiction so popular?  Well apart from being a cracking good read, in crime fiction we know that generally speaking justice will be done and the case will be resolved and that doesn’t always happen in real life.

In crime fiction the villain either gets caught or gets his/her comeuppance but in real life the evil and manipulative, the guilty can get away with it as in the case of the unsolved murder in my own family in 1959 that of my great aunt, Martha Giles.


Crime fiction can give us a resolution. It can also give us an insight into what makes people tick.
One of the reasons I believe crime fiction is popular is because people are fascinated by human behaviour. Sometimes we are warmed by the actions of others and at other times horrified and apalled by it.  I am interested in personalities, behaviour and motivation. What is it that makes people do the things they do?

I also enjoy a puzzle to solve, a crime to investigate and a mystery to unravel  and that's what I enjoy writing.  I also like plenty of action and tension. When reading a crime novel I like to pit my wits against the protagonist or the detective and see if I can solve the crime before he or she can. When writing my own police procedural crime novels featuring the rugged and flawed DI Andy Horton I often don't know  who did it, why, where or when  until I am writing the novel. As the characters begin to develop and their personalities and motivations become clearer then I begin to unravel the crime.


A DI Andy Horton Police Procedural


The same goes for my new series hero, Art Marvik. a fomer Royal Marine Commando, who becomes attached to work undercover for the UK's National Intelligence Marine Squad (NIMS).

An Art Marvik Marine Crime Mystery

 Crime fiction covers so many facets of human nature.  The same for true crime. It’s a kind of voyeurism, the ghoul factor that causes people to stand and gawp at an accident or incident. Me though, I’m a real coward. I run a mile from reading true crime. Give me crime fiction any day where I can see that justice is served and my heroes triumphs!



Saturday, 25 June 2016

Last chance to enter the free prize draw competition to win signed copies of Pauline Rowson's new crime novels

Portsmouth International Port is celebrating its 40th anniversary with a competition and free prize draw to win signed copies of two of the latest crime novels by Portsmouth author, Pauline Rowson.

Why not delve into the adventures of DI Andy Horton in Fatal Catch and marine investigator, Art Marvik in Dangerous Cargo.



Great reading and an excellent addition to any ferry or cruise trip.


Entries must be received by 30 June 2016. Only one entry per person.

Enter the competition here.

Thursday, 23 June 2016

Fascinating forensic snippets

During my research I come across some interesting little forensic facts. Here are a couple.

Did you know that in England a DNA test taken by the police usually takes 5 days for the results to come through. Not quite what you see on the television or read in crime fiction where the results can be portrayed as almost instantaneous - still we are allowed to bend the rules occasionally, after all it is fiction! ( I have been told though that DNA tests can be fast-tracked as can fingerprints)

Did you know that somewhere in England (the location is a secret) there is a very large forensic archive storage warehouse where all the evidence which has been collected on cases solved, unsolved and unresolved are held.  Let's hope there is never a fire!

Wednesday, 22 June 2016

The second in the Art Marvik marine mystery crime novels, Dangerous Cargo, opens in the Dorset Coastal Town of Swanage

Dangerous Cargo opens in the Dorset coastal town of Swanage where former Royal Marine Commando, turned marine investigator, Art Marvik, finds himself on a new assignment for the UK’s National Intelligence Marine Squad. (NIMS). It’s his second mission for NIMS (his first was in Silent Running published in 2015) and he’s detailed to attend the funeral of a man whose body was found washed up on a beach on the Isle of Wight in January only he’d been officially declared dead fifty-five years earlier. 


Swanage on the Dorset Coast, location for Art Marvik crime novel, Dangerous Cargo


Swanage Bay where Art Marvik anchors up in Dangerous Cargo


My research took me to Swanage, incidentally at the same time they were filming the television production Peter Pan, you can just see the ship they used situated at the end of the pier in the above photograph.  Marvik’s sturdy motor cruiser is moored up to the west of the pier in Swanage Bay.

Marvik is quickly drawn into a mission that uncovers deceit, corruption and murder spanning over half a century and the race to find a ruthless killer who will stop at nothing to make sure that the sins of the past stay precisely where they should, in the past.

I'll be posting more locations shots in some future blogs.


Dangerous Cargo, an Art Marvik marine mystery by Pauline Rowson


Dangerous Cargo is published in hardcover in the UK and is available from all good bookshops and on line.  It can also be loaned from all UK libraries.

It will be published in the USA on 1 September 2016 when it will also be released as an ebook on Kindle and Kobo and will be available on loan from USA libraries.

Tuesday, 21 June 2016

Pauline Rowson discusses using time frames when writing a novel

Time frames in novels, and particularly when writing a series, as I do with the DI Andy Horton novels, and more recently with the new crime series, featuring former Royal Marine Commando, Art Marvik, are a tricky thing. There is ‘real time’ and there is ‘fictional time’.

In ‘real time’ I write one DI Andy Horton and one Art Marvik a year whereas in ‘fictional time’ the novels are set over a shorter time frame. Andy Horton was thirty nine when I created him in Tide of Death in 2006 so by now he should be forty nine. However, in ‘fictional time’, twelve novels later, he is only forty. The novels take place not over ten years but over eighteen months, which means for DI Andy Horton there are an awful lot of murders in Portsmouth and the Isle of Wight, making it worse that Midsomer Murder on a good day!

It's said that Agatha Christie regretted making Hercule Poirot sixty when she created him because by the time she finished writing about him he would in ‘real time’ have been about a hundred and eight! In ‘fictional time’ Poirot stayed more or less the same age. I'm not saying that will happen to DI Andy Horton, he may age yet.

Following 'fictional time' allows the author to develop the back story. In DI Andy Horton's case it allows me to chart his marital break-up, his fight to gain access to his daughter, and his search for the truth behind his mother’s disappearance when he was child.

With Art Marvik there is his struggle to adjust to civilian life and, from the second in the series, Dangerous Cargo, to be published in May 2016, there is the mystery behind the death of his marine archaeologist parents’ when he was seventeen, thought to be an accident but was it?

In my crime novels I try to avoid mentioning the current year if I possibly can, leaving it to the imagination of the reader. The other problem with real time is that technology changes and so too do the names of police departments as they are merged, reorganised and cut back. I started by talking about the Serious Organised Crime Agency which in October 2013 became the National Crime Agency.  It becomes increasingly difficult to keep up with all the name changes and often by the time the novel is published some of the police departments mentioned no longer exist in that format and that name.

Technology also advances so being specific can in one novel look bang-up-to-date and yet in another written a year or two later look grossly dated. MySpace, which was once all the rage, has been overtaken by Facebook in popularity, which in turn may very well also fade into the distance just as the iPad could become but a distant memory as something else replaces it. A powerful argument I think to create a police or murder mystery crime series set in the past.

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