Thanks New Zealand

In Cold Daylight has not only made it onto the World Book Day list, and the Shedworking site, http://www.shedworking.co.uk/ but has now reached the beautiful shores of New Zealand where Graham Beattie, who runs a very entertaining and informative book blog, http://www.beattiesbookblog.blogspot.com/ has written about it. What's more, In Cold Daylight, follows on from an interview with Ian Rankin. Eat your heart out kid, I'm coming up fast behind you! ( If only). Now if I had his sales perhaps I could afford to fly to New Zealand and say hi to the tons of relatives and friends who seem to be escaping Britain's green and pleasant land for a new life over there. But I'm forgetting that not only do I dislike flying and airports, but that after wittering on in the Sunday Times a couple of weeks ago about the environmental issues surrounding the expansion of Heathrow Airport it would be hypocritical of me to take to the air. However, a round-the-world cruise wouldn't be ruled out, after all, my crime and thriller novels are marine mysteries so it's much more fitting for me to take to the sea. And along with my lap-top computer just think of all that writing I could get done, just as long as it was a small cruise ship without hundreds and thousands of people. I get panicky in crowds. Not asking much am I? How about a container ship? Now you're talking. I've always fancied travelling on a container ship, (it probably stems from watching Across the Pacific starring Humphrey Bogart) and there are some great trips you can do on them. What's more they only take about half a dozen or a dozen passengers at the most. Now that would be right up my ocean. Thank you Graham, and to that's books blog http://thatsbooks.blogspot.com/ who are also running the latest story on In Cold Daylight reaching the World Book Day Spread the Word list.

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